Tag Archives: customer

Who needs a concierge?

In our internet driven and social media obsessed world we can access numerous review sites, read travel blogs, get directions instantaneously and ask friends for recommendations at the click of a button (or face to face if we are feeling old school). With this in mind, I have been questioning the need for a hotel concierge. I mean, what can they tell me that Google can’t?! Especially if they look like miserable, tired, ‘bored with life’ type people wearing uncomfortable hotel uniform…and start to awkwardly twitch as you approach them with a simple question.

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Yes I’ve experienced concierges like this many times over the past few months, one at a hotel in New York in the summer who even went to print something for me from the back room and never came back..!

Surely hotel owners should be looking for other cost effective ways to help travellers find what they need – internet kiosks in reception or no strings attached free WiFi for example which is increasingly a guest expectation rather than a ‘nice to have.’

That’s what I thought until staying at The Shore Club hotel in Miami. Half reluctantly being led by my hubby over to the concierge desk on our first day we were greeted by Reo, a friendly looking guy in his late 30s wearing a loose fitting, bright coloured shirt. He welcomed us over with a huge smile, shook our hands and immediately complimented my engagement ring. Yes one could argue this was maybe a touch on the ‘false’ side, but I didn’t care. I’m on holiday and this guy was making an effort to make us, as guests of the hotel, feel welcomed and a little bit special.

We got talking about all of the things we could do during our stay in Florida and it became clear quite quickly that he knew his stuff, telling us the best bars to go to, the best Keys to visit, the best restaurants to eat in on each Key and the best day of the week and time of day to go. He was talking from experience, giving us little anecdotes from his own personal adventures. He was passionate and clearly loved his job. Every other guest who walked past gave him a wave. He asked how the things he’d recommended they do had panned out, remembering each person and exactly where they had been without taking any focus away from us. He spoke to us about how he ended up in Miami, having lived in the Caribbean, South America, LA, Australia and London. He randomly switched to the most impressive South London accent I have ever heard an American do which could have fooled even a Londoner into thinking he was from Streatham. He printed stuff out for us from the room behind him whilst still talking to us, rather than doing a disappearing act.

All in all, Reo was amazing and completely changed my view of hotel concierges. We even became the people giving him a little wave the next day as we came back from our trip to the Keys and he couldn’t wait to ask us about it. As we hopped into our car yesterday he bounced over to see us off, asking where we were heading for the day, genuinely caring about us making the most of our trip, telling us ‘I’m here for you if you need anything.’

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Reo clearly injects his personality into every interaction he has with each guest of the Shore Club hotel, wholeheartedly caring about each individual having the best holiday possible with nothing being too much trouble. But above anything, he has a twinkle in his eye and loves what he does. It’s not so much about what he is recommending guests do, but the way in which he recommends it.

This is absolutely when hotel concierges are worthwhile – when they not only tell you about the experiences you can have, but become part of the holiday experience itself. Anyone can simply look up an address and send something to the printer. Hotels should be looking to only employ a concierge who can naturally do more than this…an individual who is passionate about travel and people…an individual who doesn’t just follow the hotel brand guidelines but someone who does their own thing to make every guest have the best trip they can possibly have.

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What is the quickest way to board a plane?

Many will agree that boarding a plane can be a frustrating experience. Being stuck in a queue, in a narrow aisle, whilst others around you fight for overhead luggage space is enough to get you in a bad mood. This article has acknowledged that the typical way we board an aircraft is not efficient and claims to have the ultimate solution:

http://www.vox.com/2014/4/25/5647696/the-way-we-board-airplanes-makes-absolutely-no-sense